CRIMES AND CORRUPTIONS OF THE NEW WORLD ORDER NEWS (mparent7777_1) wrote,
CRIMES AND CORRUPTIONS OF THE NEW WORLD ORDER NEWS
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VA Hospital Released Vet Who Refused To Be Guinea Pig: VA Secretary Apologizes

ALLIANCE FOR HUMAN RESEARCH PROTECTION - Promoting Openness, Full Disclosure, and Accountability
http://www.ahrp.org and http://ahrp.blogspot.com


The secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs has apologized to the family of an Army veteran who died last year after being turned away from a Bronx VA hospital after he refused to participate in an Alzheimer's disease study.

His widow, Mrs. Aimee Fitzgerald, said that researchers at the Bronx VA wanted her husband to enroll in the Alzheimer's experiment "to observe the natural and ravaging course of the disease and his eventual death."

When he (and she) refused to give consent, Mrs. Fitzgerald charges, the hospital turned her husband away without providing the care that he needed. He died within the month.

Hospital officials deny it, but the documents that Mrs. Fitzgerald showed us, back her up. 

Mrs. Fitzgerald is demanding answers from the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) as to whether human research testing is taking a priority over the health care of veterans at its hospitals. 

"I want them to be held accountable for this, to prevent this from happening to someone else," Aimee Fitzgerald said. "Nothing could have saved Joe, but the care there was hateful and incompetent."

From readers' comments about this "story" it is obvious that Joe Fitzgerald is not the only veteran to have been abused by a VA facility, confirming that when medicine degenerates into a commercial enterprise patients are treated like commodities.  See: http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2008/aug/22/hospital-released-vet-who-refused-study/?page=3
 
"Disposable Heroes" was the title of an investigative report by The Washington Times about the VA's unethical experimentation on US troops. "Currently, the VA and other federal agencies are conducting nearly 300 clinical studies involving veterans with PTSD. Most studies are behavioral, including one that tests the effects of yoga on PTSD sufferers. Twenty-five, however, are testing drugs on 4,796 veterans, more than half (2,488) of whom are just returning from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, according to clinical trials filed with the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and reviewed by The Times."  See: http://www.washingtontimes.com/interactives/disposable-heroes/
 
Among the controversial dangerous drugs being tested on US soldiers is Pfizer's anti-smoking drug, Chantix, whose documented serious risks include psychotic episodes, violence and suicide. The FDA acknowledged that nearly 40 suicides and more than 400 incidents of suicidal behavior have since been linked to Chantix. Yet, 1,000 soldiers were corraled as human subjects to test the effect of the drug.

Iraq war veteran James Elliott, who testified before a congressional committee in July, stated that he sought treatment from the VA for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and instead was persuaded to join a smoking-cessation study. While taking a smoking-cessation drug, he suffered a psychotic episode.

Mr. Elliott said the first doctor he visited at the Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System in Little Rock to seek treatment for PTSD "wasn't concerned about my day-to-day life. ... He wasn't concerned with my wartime experiences. He wasn't concerned about if I was going to make it home safely after the appointment."

When medicine veers from its therapeutic focus and physicians and hospitals engage in commercially-driven drug trials, patients' VA needs are sacrificed.

Contact: Vera Hassner Sharav, veracare@ahrp.org,
212-595-8974
 
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Hospital released vet who refused study - Widow sees priority as research, not care
 
WASHINGTON TIMES, Audrey Hudson 
August 22, 2008

An Army veteran seeking treatment for his sudden loss of motor skills was turned away from a veterans hospital in the Bronx, N.Y., in May 2007 after he refused to participate in a human subject experiment on Alzheimer's disease.

Joe Fitzgerald, 74, died of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease - the human form of mad cow disease - less than a month after being dismissed without diagnosis from James J. Peters VA Medical Center.

***

Moreover, Iraq war veteran James Elliott told a congressional committee in July that he sought treatment from the VA for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and instead was persuaded to join a smoking-cessation study. While taking a smoking-cessation drug, he suffered a psychotic episode.

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VA chief offers family apology
 
THE WASHINGTON TIMES, Audrey Hudson (Contact)
Tuesday, August 26, 2008

The secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs has apologized to the family of an Army veteran who died last year after being turned away from a Bronx VA hospital after he refused to participate in an Alzheimer's disease study.

Joe Fitzgerald, 74, died of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease - the human form of mad cow disease - less than a month after being dismissed without diagnosis or treatment at James J. Peters VA Medical Center, The Washington Times reported Friday.

His widow, Aimee Fitzgerald, has demanded answers from the VA as to whether human research testing is taking a priority over the health care of veterans after the agency responded that the Alzheimer's study was a "mandate."

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Tags: health, soldiers, va
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